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Introducting BitMaelum - A new mail concept

Date: 12 Jun 2020
Tags: [ crypto ]  [ email ]  [ bitmaelum

What if you can design an email system with a clean sheet. You don’t need to care about existing email clients or servers or anything at all. Even the concept of an email address can be touched. What would such a system look like? This is my attempt,..


Amazon Web Services

Date: 20 May 2020
Tags: [ aws ]  [ amazon

More often than not, I’m using Amazon Web Services (AWS) as my “cloud”. Not only for my own projects, but almost all customers I’m working for use Amazon for hosting their applications. So over time you build up a lot of experience on AWS service: you know how to (correctly) setup VPC’s, know when to you ECS, EC2 or lambda to host code and even services like S3, SNS and SQS pose no challenges anymore.

But there are a lot of AWS services available. And I do mean: a LOT. Currently, there are 163 (!) different services that are available from the Amazon Dashboard, each with their own way of working, difficulties, catches and best practises.


Symfony's autowiring

Date: 19 Sep 2017
Tags: [ symfony ]  [ autowire ]  [ magic

When asking people if they use Symfony’s autowiring functionality, an often heard excuse why people don’t use it is because of all the magic that is happening during autowiring. But just like most impressive magic tricks, once explained, it all boils down to a few simple principles and Symfony’s autowiring is nothing different in that perspective. In this blogpost I will explain the new autowiring and autoconfiguration features, and why you should love them.


Write your own GitHub clone

Date: 28 Feb 2016
Tags: [ github ]  [ git

Shower thought: What would it take to write your own GitHub clone? Answer: not that much! I’ve spend a few hours on tinkering with some of the basic concepts, and it turns out it’s actually quite easy to set something up from scratch. And before you all go and write comments that it not feature-complete: yes, I know. But most of them are fairly trivial to implement though, and my goal was to actually see if we can get the foundations up and running. Implementing things like an issue-tracker and webhooks isn’t part of that.


My guide to commenting on joind.in

Date: 17 Dec 2015
Tags: [ joindin

If you are visiting pretty much any (random) PHP conference these days, you will hear a lot of talk about “rating talks on joind.in”. For those not familiar with this site: it’s a site where you can find additional information about the talk (like slides), and where you can leave a rating and/or comment about the talks and conferences that you have attended.

It’s a great way to prepare for an upcoming conference: check out the talks you want to see, and see if the presenter has already given the presentation at another conference and view the rating / comments. This way, you have a good picture (although never the complete picture), of the presentation you are about to see. Also, often presenters will add their slidedeck to talks, so you can actually see what the presentation will look like.


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